Old Parson 
Fine art Photography

New Countess

My largest camera is the "New Countess" - a 10x8, bellows field camera made of mahogany and, unusually, aluminium.

It has been hard to find information about this camera. The only info. I have found relates to the "Countess" (see below) not New Countess - so the New Countess is probably from the early 1900s.

 

This camera came with an unbranded lens with a rotating disc f-stop running from f8 to f64 that gives a great look to images.

I had only on double dark slide come with the camera and have been able to source a second. However, one of these is slightly warped so lets light in unless the back is covered with the dark viewing cloth.

Since purchase I have replaced the original, hole-y, bellows with a new set. I love the scale of images I can make with this camera, and use it mainly for still life and macro images, although hope to do some portraiture when Covid lock-down restrictions allow.

The London & Paris Optic & Clock Company was owned or managed by J.S. Johnson and Walter H. Thompson and later by Thompson alone. They sold a number of cameras in their 'Royalty' range, the Countess camera is shown in the YBP 1893, p. cx and appears to be based on J.E. Brown's designs. The Duke is shown in PA 1891, p. clxi. The cameras were probably manufactured by several firms to be sold under the LPOC brand. The LPOC was wound up in 1910 but was probably not active by that time, the owners are shown as T.A. Reynolds, Alfred T. Reynolds and W. Horace Thompson.

After 1900 advertising is in the name of W.H. Thompson.

 

References: YBP 1889, p. cxlvi. YBP 1891, p. xciv. Lon. Gaz. 6/9/1910.

© April 2021 by Simon Williams